Coaching for competence can lead to confidence...


We all like working with people that are competent and confident enough to get the job done. But every now and then we end up working with braggards who talk too much and do too little. I guess they do it because they can and nobody stops them. As managers, we’ve had both types, and it’s no fun dealing with the latter. But in the pursuit of accountability and excellence, this is the kind of behavior that can and should be minimized by coaching and, if necessary, a difficult conversation. I say ‘difficult’ because most managers try to avoid having ones like this. But an honest discussion about performance expectations and goals, and then providing timely feedback may help people like that improve and be more effective, competent, and confident because they then will know what it takes to get a job done properly. And if you succeed in turning them around, the upside includes better individual performance, happier co-workers, and improved overall organizational results. This all starts with supervisors getting actively involved in managing the performance of every employee that works for them. Chances are, more than 80% of them need little or no coaching as you catch and recognize them for doing things right, allowing you to work to change the remaining few. If they do, great; but if not, at least you’ll know you tried. Be proud to help all your employees gain the competence and confidence to perform effectively today.  

 

Johnny Unitas (1933 – 2002): American football quarterback who played in the National Football League for 18 seasons