Change strategies for changing times...


Yesterday I was opining about the importance and value of employee engagement and how managers can make that happen. Now, more than ever, the intersection of servant leadership and emotional intelligence is where they’ll find the skills and tools to create and reinforce high levels of employee engagement. The first part of that combination is the philosophy that leaders should have a goal of serving their employees – listening, empathizing, coaching, communicating, motivating, and generally helping them to be their best. The second defines the array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance like recognizing their own emotions and those of others, discerning between different feelings and labeling them appropriately, using emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, and adjusting emotions to adapt to changing situations. That’s far different from just offering employees things to encourage them to be more engaged with the company, their colleagues, and your customers; it is all about managing emotions and situations concurrently, which can be rather tricky. And those weren’t the skills often found in pre-pandemic times; more likely, they were the ones managers were encouraged to stay away from. This intersection is now one of many ways to go forward in post-pandemic times, especially as leaders work to rebuild trust, respect, security, and loyalty. If you don’t adopt these new strategies, you just might find yourself, your team, and your company standing still today.

 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882 – 1945): often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American politician who served as the 32nd president of the United States