Hands-on matters....


Most companies spend too much time talking about standards and too little time training their employees to achieve them. I understand that training is hard to schedule and can be costly: that’s why good training strategies and program design are important. First, the person doing the training must be trained to be an effective trainer. Second, trainers need a detailed training outline containing the what, why, and how of what they are instructing.  Third, training needs to include lots of hands-on exercises to give the new employee an opportunity to really practice and understand the things they’ll be expected to do.  Adult learners need hands-on exercises: reading and lecturing help, but it takes this kind of participation to really understand; this also gives trainers and supervisors the opportunity to evaluate and coach their new employees. But expecting new employees to learn by osmosis is unfair to them, their co-workers, and their customers: we all know this to be true and yet everywhere we look there are less-than-trained workers struggling to perform adequately.  Don’t put your new employees in this kind of situation: help them to really know and understand what’s expected today.

Dr. Debasish Mridha (b. 1966): American physician, philosopher, poet, and author